Impressionism

Joaquim Mir Trinxet (Barcelona, 1873 – 1940)

Riverbank in the Forest 
Oil on Linen 100 x 120 cm 1918

A calm view of the banks of the river from La Mogoda Caldes , the home of his good friend Juan Antonio Guell

He is considered one of the greatest representatives of Spanish impressionist landscape art. 

Colour and light meant everything to Mir, and he used them to build a personal idiom in which he created a surprisingly modern oeuvre, beyond the art movements like Impressionism or Symbolism with which critics have often sought to associate him. Although his artistic development varied between realism and abstraction, two features crop up throughout his entire output: the urge to establish a new vision of nature and an unremitting search for beauty marked by genuine creative tension.

Born in Barcelona in 1873, he studied at the Llotja School and was a disciple of Lluís Graner. He formed the Colla del Safrà group in 1893 with Isidre Nonell, Ramon Pichot, Julio Vallmitjana and Adriá Gual. 

Towards the end of the 19th century he was close to the artistic environment of Els Quatre Gats. In 1901 he travelled to Majorca with Ruisiñol and stayed at La Calobra, where he painted some of his finest works. Of particular note are the murals he painted for his uncle and sponsor Avelino Trinxet Casas. 

In 1903 he moved to Reus for health reasons and painted the landscapes of L’Aleixar and Maspujols starting in 1906. He also drew scenes of Barcelona for the magazines ‘L’Esquella de la Torratxa’ and ‘Hispania’. 

He died in Barcelona in 1940 after a stay in prison, accused by the dictatorship of collusion with the Republic.

“All I want is for my works to lighten the heart and flood the eyes and the soul with light.” Joaquim Mir Trinxet 1928

http://www.spainisculture.com/en/artistas_creadores/joaquim_mir.html

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s