Diary of an Adventure

Harbour Town Adventures

Beach walk at Sedgefield before a quick stop at the market for blue skies organic salt. Studio busy with holiday tourists and the canvas for the Etosha commission on the easel. An underpainting of two blue-grey mixtures. Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Umber, as well as Cobalt Blue and Burnt Sienna. Dashes of Cerulean Blue adding depth.

Fabulous dinner. J9. Chef Coreta. Amuse-bouche of Chev, melon, Parma ham and dill served with Ghost Corner Bowline. Grilled halloumi, roast tomatoes, on a bed of butter lettuce served with ‘Courageous’, dry land barrel fermented Chenin as the starter and a main of Kingklip, pancetta, Parmesan, dill in a Champagne and cream sauce. a selection of wine that included Colmont MCC, Miss Lucy, Radford Dale Chardonnay,  Driehoek, Oak Valley and Newton Johnson Family Vineyard Pinot Noir. Tarte au Chocolate as a dessert served with Doran Vineyard Shiraz. 

Via’s are hosting my art and painting demonstration as part of the Greyton Art Walk. I have a collection of my small paintings, as well as a few of the silk scarf wearable art range for something different.

‘The Walk the Experience’ gives access to various artists studios and homes, providing insight into working methods, techniques and inspiration.
My early run took me out onto the trails through the hills outside the Village. Taxing in the extreme!
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Diary of an Adventure

Harbour Town Adventures

‘Leisure Walk’, a small painting in the series of paintings I’m doing for the Greyton Art Walk. Hijacked by Terry for her desk. ‘Forest Elephant’ the most challenging.
Slow grilled beef short rib, on the Kamado Jan, while tasty,  not fantabulous. Even with the button mushrooms and bacon, Gordon Ramsey assistance. Mistakingly having the short-rib sliced into strips didn’t help,as they cooked too quickly, without any of the anticipated  impressive sauce.
Phantom pass. Crossing the Red Bridge. Shoulder, cracking and popping as it settles into the abuse of off-road riding. Glad for the grading of the roads to reduce the corrugations. Confidence stretched, brakes working hard, on the way down.
Blood sugars struggling to handle the running, cycling and that tad too much wine. Inevitable with the World Cup rugby euphoria at J9, and Craig’s fabulous wine cellar.

Leisure Walk

Acrylic on canvas 20cmx20cm

Diary of an Adventure

Gallery Adventure

Why Should I Hesitate: Putting Drawings to Work’, the William Kentridge exhibitions At the Zeitz MOCAA
Of particular significance for me, the inclusion of his studio practice within the exhibition was fascinating and how the video’s of his works have been developed into the stories that, while profoundly disturbing, capture his whirling mind within the environment that directs his creative process. 
‘The studio is central. It is the space in which we discover who we are, through the process of making.’
William Kentridge
Senses overloaded by the visuals that if not dramatic enough in black and white, with streaks of red, screamed at you through the large megaphones. Both those depicted visually and those blasting sound within the installations. Ramming his message home in a ‘deaf’ world?
I was glad to come out into the sunshine and a glass of wine! 
Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture, at the Norval Foundation. 
Clever. Bizarre. Disturbing. Fantastical. Noise. His signature megaphones, less of ‘His Master’s Voice’ but rather those used to cower through blasted propaganda.
I do wonder how the new propaganda tool, social media that seeks to manipulate messaging that ferments division and hatred will be depicted in the art of the future? 
If nothing, a headache is certain.
The sculptures in Rebus are playful and intriguing as they transform from a simple edge into different shapes depending on how they are viewed. Guess much like the truth of anything. Light playing it’s own role in resolving the puzzle of the logical and illogical.
I couldn’t connect the massive sculptures in the main gallery to the vista through the windows to the mountains. It seems unlikely that the sculptures were randomly placed, without taking the movement of sunlight and the backdrop into account. 
Senses beaten into submission?
Silhouette figures in cut out steel, Solid Shadows at the entrance evoke the same feelings I experienced walking through an abandoned steel mill, or mine. Casting shadows of past glory, they remain hunks of black steel, against blue skies.
Diary of an Adventure

Gallery Adventure

Why Should I Hesitate: Putting Drawings to Work’, the William Kentridge exhibitions At the Zeitz MOCAA
Of particular significance for me, the inclusion of his studio practice within the exhibition was fascinating and how the video’s of his works have been developed into the stories that, while profoundly disturbing, capture his whirling mind within the environment that directs his creative process. 
‘The studio is central. It is the space in which we discover who we are, through the process of making.’
William Kentridge
Senses overloaded by the visuals that if not dramatic enough in black and white, with streaks of red, screamed at you through the large megaphones. Both those depicted visually and those blasting sound within the installations. Ramming his message home in a ‘deaf’ world?
I was glad to come out into the sunshine and a glass of wine! 
Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture, at the Norval Foundation. 
Clever. Bizarre. Disturbing. Fantastical. Noise. His signature megaphones, less of ‘His Master’s Voice’ but rather those used to cower through blasted propaganda.
I do wonder how the new propaganda tool, social media that seeks to manipulate messaging that ferments division and hatred will be depicted in the art of the future? 
If nothing, a headache is certain.
The sculptures in Rebus are playful and intriguing as they transform from a simple edge into different shapes depending on how they are viewed. Guess much like the truth of anything. Light playing it’s own role in resolving the puzzle of the logical and illogical.
I couldn’t connect the massive sculptures in the main gallery to the vista through the windows to the mountains. It seems unlikely that the sculptures were randomly placed, without taking the movement of sunlight and the backdrop into account. 
Senses beaten into submission?
Silhouette figures in cut out steel, Solid Shadows at the entrance evoke the same feelings I experienced walking through an abandoned steel mill, or mine. Casting shadows of past glory, they remain hunks of black steel, against blue skies.