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Diary of an Adventure
  -  Diary of an Adventure (Page 2)

Quiet streets of Harbour Town reverberate with pulsing exhausts of vintage Bentley’s. Fabulous looking vehicles passing the studio. A woman stopped me in the street to thank me for keeping her spirits up with my vibrant paintings and to keep painting. Straight lines the bother with my fingers, particularly as the large canvas flexes. ’Hold the Open Heart’, a William Kentridge work from his series

Carefully, the composition takes shape on the canvas. First lines. Dabs. Smears. Paint starting to give the painting form. Composition too far left! Grateful for the support of clients in the studio. Particularly at this time of turmoil. Studio, quiet. In sharp contrast to the chaos unfolding at supermarkets. And we have free wine! The world has gone crazy. Yet we have our emergency insulin,

’Palette Leftovers’ Acrylic on canvas 70cmx200cm Marathon day. Singing and dancing supporters turning it into a street party, which Prince didn't appreciate. Especially after another night of lightning storms. The cheese-based crust (using a different recipe) for the Beef Wellington didn't hold its shape in the Kamado Jan, resulting in a sort of mush. Fortunately, it still tasted great, but I think that had more to

A few small paintings of Knysna seahorses, with the residue paint being applied to my canvas ’Palette Leftovers’. Airport eerily quiet. No frantic queues through security, chairs available in the departure lounge and an absence of aircraft on the apron. The shrinking of SAA’s domestic routes culling planes, and the slowdown in international travel as the world deals with coronavirus. This before the first

’Fisherman’ Oil on canvas 76cmx104cm Indian Yellow and Alizarin Crimson, rather than the Madder Red I used in the initial painting of the ’Fisherman’, has given it an unintended ’fiery’ glow. Somewhat poetical, given that the first painting was destroyed in a fire? Mixing the Alizarin Crimson with Burnt Umber changed the tone, creating a much more powerful portrait, and closer to what I was

Sweltering days making painting difficult. My hands sweating in the gloves. Getting them on, a sticky mess. The studio, busy with tourists, walking around between golf games. One of my favourite paintings from our time in Pringle Bay ’Storm’ sold to an American couple and interest in some of the bigger paintings. Prince spent two days at a ’play-group’. He passed his behavioural assessment with

‘Poppies and olives’Oil on board 220cmx92cm Painted in 2002, a client resale in the studio Something magical about a road-trip in the early morning, as the sun begins it's journey. Even without coffee to start the day, as load-shedding impacts our lives. Driving three hours for a dinner may seem a tad excessive. However, the dining experience at La Sosta in Swellendam is unbelievable and should

Small commissioned painting of a zebra and start made on the portrait of ’The Fisherman’. A painting to replace one of my paintings lost in a house fire. The zebra still resembling a cart-horse, with none of the ’lightness’ I'm striving to attain. The rich grey, turning everything to a flat mush. Happier with the proportions of the head. Something, at least! A tad

’Morning Mist’ Acrylic on canvas 120cmx40cm From a photo by Craig Smith, the ethereal beauty of the estuary covered in mist. I used grey’s of Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Umber and Cobalt Blue and Burnt Siena to create warm, cold tension. Permanent Magenta and a hint of Lemon Yellow and Cyan for effect. World turned upside-down. Thunderstorms driving Prince demented. Sleep deprived. Garage flooded. Fortunately, no

’Women in the Waves’ Acrylic on Canvas 200cmx70cm Too many conflicting ideas messing about with my painting of the ’Women in the Waves’. Decided to stop smearing paint in the canvas. Happy with areas of the painting, while other bits are a tad overworked. Summer. Visitors fleeing to confront the start of the new job year. Weather  switched to glorious. If a tad stifling. Early Steenbok